World Championships Ranking

This is a reminder on ranking for World Championships. The original post on this site July 23 2018 HERE outlined the ranking events for 2019 and 2020 World Championships in accordance with the ALCA Ranking Policy and explained the reasons for these.

The summary of this is;

Non Masters

2019 World Championships – ranking by results in 2019 Australian and Oceania Championships (Devonport).

2020 World Open Men’s Standard, Women’s Radial and Men’s Radial Worlds February 2020 Sandringham also ranked by results in 2019 Australian and Oceania Championships (Devonport).

2020 All other World Championship events held in northern hemisphere summer 2020 – ranking by results in 2020 Australian Championships (January 2020 Sandringham).

Masters

2019 Masters World Championships Port ZĂ©lande Netherlands September 2019 ranking events, each with 100 points are 2017 World Masters (Croatia), 2018 World Masters (Ireland), 2018 National Masters (Mooloolaba), 2019 National Masters (Devonport), 2017/18 Season State Masters (Various Venues) and 2018/19 Season State Masters (Various Venues).

2020 Masters World Championships Geelong March 2020 ranking events, each with 100 points will be 2018 World Masters (Ireland), 2019 World Masters (Netherlands), 2018 National Masters (Mooloolaba), 2019 National Masters (Devonport), 2017/18 Season State Masters (Various Venues) and 2018/19 Season State Masters (Various Venues).

There have been a few enquiries about World rank order when sailors have sailed the qualifying event in one rig and applied to sail in the Worlds in another. We have made provision to allow this by ranking the sailors proportional to their place in their qualifying fleet i.e. 100% if first 50% if mid fleet etc. This allows for the difference in fleet size and it allows sailors to compete with the rig most appropriate to their strength, development and the likely weather conditions. For Masters the ranking points are accumulated irrespective of the rig so already allow for different fleet sizes.

On the subject ALCA President Ken Hurling said “The years when young sailors come into the 4.7 and progress onto the Radial is a very important time in their sailing life. It’s in the younger years that injuries can happen if for example a 4.7 sailor moves into a Radial too early and is not ready for the move up. So as not to push sailors who are moving from 4.7 to Radial to compete too early in qualifying events in the larger rig we allow them to carry their qualifying place in the 4.7 into the Radial. It happens less often but the same applies to the move from Radial to Standard rig.”

Ken added “The ILCA stipulates that we only send the very best sailors to their World Championships and our ranking system is geared to ensuring this happens even as sailors progress through the rigs in their Laser Sail For Life.”